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Jutawan Era Baru by Gobala Krishnan

Jutawan Era Baru

Adakah anda bosan bekerja keras setiap hari, hanya untuk menjadikan orang lain kaya? Adakah anda benci membuat kerja yang sama setiap hari dengan gaji yang tidak memuaskan? Atau adakah anda ingin mempunyai kebebasan kewangan dan mencapai segala impian anda dalam masa yang singkat?

“Jutawan Era Baru” oleh Gobala Krishnan mendedahkan rahsia bagaimana beliau meletak jawatan sebagai seorang eksekutif dan memulakan perniagaan Internet dari rumah, dan berjaya menjana pendapatan enam angka setahun.

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The New Millionaires

The New Millionaires by Gobala Krishnan reveals why an increasing number of Malaysians prefer to work from home, make money online and live like millionaires. This book explains the difference between how wealth is made in the 20th century (Old Millionaires), and how technology has enabled a radically new breed of future millionaires (New Millionaires) who lead the new patch to richest in the new millennium.

Among other things, the book explains in details the concepts of online niche marketing residual income, Internet business automation, working from home, and blogging. It also features interviews with successful local Internet entrepreneurs in Malaysia and examples from Gobala’s own Internet businesses.

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7 thoughts on “Jutawan Era Baru by Gobala Krishnan

  1. ) This review is from: I don’t know how anynoe could read this book and not give it a five star rating. The right test for me of a fantastic book is one that stays with me one I can’t stop thinking about long after I’ve finished. I read this book for the second time in my life a month ago (first time was in high school many years ago), and I’m still haunted by the suffering endured by the Joad family. The fascinating thing is that Steinbeck wrote this book in 1939 at the height of the injustices being fraught upon the migrant workers in California. I’m sure it wasn’t well loved then as it brought to the forefront the corruption of some commanding people in America. It also spoke to the conscience of every American which eventually led to political reform in California. After reading this book, I did some research into Steinbeck’s motivation and learned that he was haunted by the plight of California’s migrant workers to the point of obsession. To fuel his rage, he would visit the migrant camps each day full of their dirt, disease and hungry people and then return home to write about those people responsible for these conditions people he considered to be murderers.Steinbeck concentrated on the circumstances of one family, The Joads, tenant farmers in Oklahoma in anticipation of they were forced out by the larger companies who wanted their land back. With dreams of luscious grapes and peaches in abundance waiting to be picked, they loaded up their belongings and started their journey on Route 66 headed for Bakersfield, California. They started their trip with a bevy of colorful characters led by Ma and Pa Joad. It’s incredible how much power Steinbeck gave to Ma Joad years before women had any right to a voice. Unfortunately, just as the Joads were heading out, so were thousands upon thousands of other families. This would ultimately lead to supply and demand. There would be too many workers for the few jobs available and, consequently, people would be agreeing to work for peanuts just to be able to feed their families.Steinbeck’s writing is astounding as the unrest of the migrants builds to a crescendo and just as the dust has risen in Oklahoma, so will the voices of the poor migrant workers. Steinbeck says, In the eyes of the hungry, there is a growing wrath. In the souls of the people, the grapes of wrath are growing gray. It is just a matter of time before their wrath is unleashed and you can feel it in every page you turn. He says that, Our people are excellent people; our people are kind people. Pray God some day kind people won’t all be poor. Pray God someday a kid can eat. I don’t know how you can read some of his words and not get teary eyed. But sixty years have passed since the writing of this book and there are still migrant tales to be told and kids who have no food to eat yet sadly the world continues despite its injustices.I won’t kid you into believing that this is an simple book to read. The first 150 pages are so slow going that I nearly had to place it down. But I kept on going just as the Joad’s kept on going and I’m surely glad I did. We could all take a lesson from their quest for survival and their quest just to be able to eat the next day. Their determination, in light of all the obstacles they had to face, is truly a lesson to be learned. You feel a sense of accomplishment after reading a book like this I know I did.

  2. and find out that as few as one man owns as much a million acres much of it lying faollw in front of their eyes.As hard as the plight of the Joads and families like them, Steinbeck does not paint the Californians or their police as evil so much as frightened into treachery and violence in order to protect their own. No one wants to starve and starvation after the dust bowl and thanks to the exploitative wages paid by the vineyard owners is a very real possibility. Nor does he canonize the migrants the societies that grow up by the side of the road each night have their own laws and lawbreakers, stout hearts and slatterns but does show them as civilized people who don’t deserve being treated like animals. Many fearful Californians don’t agree.Steinbeck’s reputation Tom Joad (whose ghost lives on in a Bruce Springsteen’s song recently roofed by Rage Against the Machine) is as vital to American literature as Huckleberry Finn, Holden Caulfield and Jay Gatsby. Joad knows life offers no simple solutions, but he also knows that honest is honest. When a man’s employers payment him for his work gear AND operate the stores where he must buy his food so that he often ends up OWING his employers more at the end of the week than his pitiful wages can cover, Tom Joad knows that’s not just. He knows the land is fertile enough to feed everyone, so don’t try giving him any speeches about private property and supply and demand. If the test of a system and a society is how it treats it poorest members (especially in a crisis like the Depression), then the world the Joads live in fails miserably. No less strong a reputation than her son Tom, Ma Joad embodies all the cliches about being a tower of strength without really being a cliche9 herself. She and her family possess all the right grit and hearty moral fiber America prides itself on as a nation of pioneers, but by the 1930s the frontier has been bought up and the pioneers are in desperate straits. This book is occasionally criticized for being too socialistic. This criticism is misguided; what THE GRAPES OF WRATH does is show how capitalism can and often does enrich the few while the many suffer. Steinbeck shows how breadbasket farmers were thrown off the land they had worked for generations so bankers in the East can make more profit. Can this happen today, even in a time of tremendous prosperity? Question today’s family farmers what agribusiness has done to them. THE GRAPES OF WRATH is no call to play the Internationale, but it does starkly and intelligently raise questions about the importance of equal opportunity and justice for all.This is a book that should be required reading for Alan Greenspan, the editors of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, and triumphal capitalists everywhere who wince for their stock dividends when the unemployment rate goes down. Not to mention every single elected official in the United States. The subject matter is extremely gray and sad, but Steinbeck’s style is straightforward and simple (even with the various dialects he employs perfectly). THE GRAPES OF WRATH does what so very few fantastic novels can: it will take a lot out of you, but leave you with much more than you had when you started.

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  4. , and I’m still haunted by the sunifrfeg endured by the Joad family. The fascinating thing is that Steinbeck wrote this book in 1939 at the height of the injustices being fraught upon the migrant workers in California. I’m sure it wasn’t well loved then as it brought to the forefront the corruption of some commanding people in America. It also spoke to the conscience of every American which eventually led to political reform in California. After reading this book, I did some research into Steinbeck’s motivation and learned that he was haunted by the plight of California’s migrant workers to the point of obsession. To fuel his rage, he would visit the migrant camps each day full of their dirt, disease and hungry people and then return home to write about those people responsible for these conditions people he considered to be murderers.Steinbeck concentrated on the circumstances of one family, The Joads, tenant farmers in Oklahoma in anticipation of they were forced out by the larger companies who wanted their land back. With dreams of luscious grapes and peaches in abundance waiting to be picked, they loaded up their belongings and started their journey on Route 66 headed for Bakersfield, California. They started their trip with a bevy of colorful characters led by Ma and Pa Joad. It’s incredible how much power Steinbeck gave to Ma Joad years before women had any right to a voice. Unfortunately, just as the Joads were heading out, so were thousands upon thousands of other families. This would ultimately lead to supply and demand. There would be too many workers for the few jobs available and, consequently, people would be agreeing to work for peanuts just to be able to feed their families.Steinbeck’s writing is astounding as the unrest of the migrants builds to a crescendo and just as the dust has risen in Oklahoma, so will the voices of the poor migrant workers. Steinbeck says, In the eyes of the hungry, there is a growing wrath. In the souls of the people, the grapes of wrath are growing gray. It is just a matter of time before their wrath is unleashed and you can feel it in every page you turn. He says that, Our people are excellent people; our people are kind people. Pray God some day kind people won’t all be poor. Pray God someday a kid can eat. I don’t know how you can read some of his words and not get teary eyed. But sixty years have passed since the writing of this book and there are still migrant tales to be told and kids who have no food to eat yet sadly the world continues despite its injustices.I won’t kid you into believing that this is an simple book to read. The first 150 pages are so slow going that I nearly had to place it down. But I kept on going just as the Joad’s kept on going and I’m surely glad I did. We could all take a lesson from their quest for survival and their quest just to be able to eat the next day. Their determination, in light of all the obstacles they had to face, is truly a lesson to be learned. You feel a sense of accomplishment after reading a book like this I know I did.

  5. There are many subject sndrdatas that I want to tell you here: 1. Critical topic 2. Hot topic that consists of several positive and negative effects 3. Main results after this topic end 4. Must create solving-problem side and technical effects 5. Create quick summarize that give reader a time for making future research. Thanks for giving me opportunities in commenting your site, especially if you want to give summary point for that. Nice time to see you.

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